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Ethical practice - Lesson 5: your reflections

 Welcome to the online community learning space for the lesson: Encouraging transparency. Use this forum to discuss the community reflective activity in the lesson. Read the contributions of others, ‘liking’ those you find helpful and add your unique reflections to the conversation by replying to this post. Click here to return to the lesson page at any time.

Community reflective activity: 
Your organisation is looking to provide grants to local charities and community groups as part of its activity with regard to corporate social responsibility. This is to be managed by the people function. What suggestion would you make to ensure this process is as transparent as possible?

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  • We do provide support to two charities.  When this was brokered across the company, we were all provided with a list of charities, a brief about each and a voting button/s to inform our personal choice.

    When the results were ready, everyone was clearly informed in a graph how each charity was scored and the successful charities selected.

    Everyone had a stake in this process and due to the process used, a 100% feedback was received.  

  • In reply to Kevin Pollard:

    A great example Kevin, I like the way that you showed the scores in the graph to demonstrate the results in a transparent way.
  • In reply to Kevin Pollard:

    This is not something we offer but I think your process sounds perfect Kevin!
  • I think as Kevin has said being able to demonstrate how it was voted is the most ethical way of selecting a charity whilst remaining transparent.

    If it wasnt a vote however just being able to show the process whereby the charity was chosen and by merit would help maintain transparency.
  • In reply to Kevin Pollard:

    I really like the fact that everyone gets to have a say and that there was transparency throughout the process, Kevin, helps people to feel valued and clearly demonstrates that the decision was made fairly.
  • In case you haven't yet seen these I thought it would be useful to share the link to a three-part webinar series CIPD are delivering on ethical practice at work in March and April 2020. Click here to find out more www.cipd.co.uk/.../ethics-at-work-webinars
  • In reply to Kevin Pollard:

    This reminded me of the Community Matters scheme at Waitrose where customers effectively vote with token to split a fixed charity donation amount according to vote weightings each month with the acrylic box dived into three receptacle columns (one for each charity) acting as a 3D version of the graph Kevin describes, & a literally transparent indicator of how the money is donated!
  • In reply to Kevin Pollard:

    This reminded me of the Community Matters scheme at Waitrose where customers effectively vote with token to split a fixed charity donation amount according to vote weightings each month with the acrylic box dived into three receptacle columns (one for each charity) acting as a 3D version of the graph Kevin describes, & a literally transparent indicator of how the money is donated!
  • In reply to Michelle Battista:

    If you missed the CIPD ethics webinars you can listen to the recordings that are available on this CIPD webpage... www.cipd.co.uk/.../ethics-work-guide
  • In reply to Michelle Battista:

    If you missed the CIPD ethics webinars you can listen to the recordings that are available on this CIPD webpage... www.cipd.co.uk/.../ethics-work-guide
  • In reply to Tim:

    I've seen similar kinds of initiatives in other supermarkets too, Tim, a really nice way of giving customers a voice and ensuring transparency. I also saw that this process was used when deciding upon which charities to support for the entire year - gives a real local feel to initiatives and puts a sense of community at the heart, love it!
  • The organisation I worked for sent out communication to all staff regarding its intention to support a charity as part of its social responsibility and its reasons for supporting a particular charity. Employees were informed that the decision had been arrived at by the Board of Directors and the Executive Members of the company. They had conducted a rigorous selection process during which the respective charities gave presentations on reasons for much needed support. As part of the process of sponsoring the Charity, employees were to come up with various fund raising events during the year. Once the proceeds had been collated, the company would be match the total amount and this would be sent to the charity. This worked very well because there was clear communication, staff involvement, this kept staff motivated to contribute and the outcome was clearly stated. Once the funds were raised, the company communicated the total amount that would be sent to the Charity. I would recommend a similar process.
  • In reply to Frances:

    I can understand why this process was successful, even though some may argue that the employees should have be allowed to vote for which charity was supported. By keeping everyone informed about how the decision was made and the rigorous selection methods used etc this provided full transparency and resulted in high levels of contribution and involvement.
  • I think Kevin's post has demonstrated perfectly how this can be achieved. Encouraging employees to nominate a charity, and then all voting on the final selection is a brilliant way to gain interest and engagement with the project, whilst demonstrating to the business that their perspective not only matters, but is actioned upon too.
  • Suggestion schemes is a good approach in creating innovative ways to introduce, implement ways to engage in promoting the business growth, development and involvement; investing in individuals capabilities, talent in exceptional performance within the business in supporting the community and the development of individuals; openness to transparency in the sharing of ideas and concepts.