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What do recruitment decisions in the UK ultimately boil down to?

It's always a collective management decision in terms of who they decide to employ and who they decide to reject.  
In Germany, it's a bit different that even if they do not personally connect, click, gel, warm to or even like you during the interview, if they however feel that you are the best very person and strongest candidate for the role based purely on your skills, qualifications and experience, they will then give you the job as they feel you deserve the role. 
However, it's a bit more hazy here.      
Suitability, capability, team fit, usefulness, potential performance, or even delving into the whole realm of psychology in terms of Britain's Got Talent or the X Factor in terms of the Aeroplane Test (do I wish to be stuck with this person for 8 hours in a departure lounge) or do you make me feel good about you, are right for me, deliver and tick for the right boxes for me when feeling good about myself et al?  
In a sense, it's like playing a game. 
But more to the point, is the main factor that separates a candidate who always walked away with and obtained a job offer, and one which always walked away with and received a 'I regret to be the bearer of bad news' email was that all things equal, although you demonstrated your ability, they essentially still did not like you enough to actually employ?      
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  • Andre said:
    if they however feel that you are the best very person and strongest candidate for the role based purely on your skills, qualifications and experience, they will then give you the job as they feel you deserve the role. 

    I think that this is probably true for the majority of roles and recruitment decisions in the UK (like it is only true for the majority of decisions in Germany)

    I have never knowingly turned down the best candidate in favour of a lesser candidate that I happened to "Like" more.

  • If the question concerns what recruitment decisions "...ultimately boil down to" then unconscious bias is surely the answer. I'm assuming here that each shortlisted candidate has appropriate skills, qualifications and experience to successfully fulfil the role. Once those elements are established the decision is ultimately based on gut instinct (aka unconscious bias).
  • In reply to Sue Eakin:

    What is unconscious bias in a fine nutshell?
  • In reply to Andre:

    Everyone is subject to cultural programming. For example, when we walk into a room and see a blond woman or a person with an untidy appearance, we unconsciously ‘label’ them, put them into ‘boxes’ and believe that we know their characteristics. Those 'boxes' are a manifestation of our unconscious biases. Once we're aware of it, we can (and should) try to question it.
  • In reply to Sue Eakin:

    I thought it was more along the lines of employing people who are like or similar to you in certain aspects.
  • In reply to Keith:

    Is Recruitment also about getting the very best fit and match for that role at the time and not just purely who has the most on paper and years of experience behind them?
  • In reply to Andre:

    I am not sure why you suggest this is an either / or option here?

    You test whats on paper at an interview
  • I have worked in a few countries (including Germany) and didn't see a difference in the recruitment decision approach. The candidate who most closely matches the required skills
    (technical and soft skills) will get the job.