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Shortlisting opinions

I applied for an internal position which has no person specification but has a job description. I asked for a person specification and I was told that all the info was on the website.

How was shortlisting done? Based on the future job description? 

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  • There is no legal requirement for a person specification. I assume it was done based on the JD which is reasonably standard
  • Perhaps they pulled names out of a hat. Like Keith says there's no requirement for a person specification, and in any case you work there as I assume, so do the other candidates. I'd assume that the company already know quite a lot about applicant's ability anyway.
  • In reply to David Perry:

    I received the person specification yesterday and no one has met one of the essential criteria because ILF ceased to exist in 2014. Also, one of the internal candidates doesn’t meet at least 2 more essential criteria. Horror and shock! He has been shortlisted. In case you are wondering how I know he doesn’t meet those criteria, I am his line manager. Is there any point in letting HR know? Would my head of department make my life hell for reporting them?
  • In reply to Ashley:

    I think you want to think about what you actually want to achieve.

    From what you have written it would appear that the manager concerned may have already decided on the basis of promoting someone he/she already knows even if they don't meet the necessary requirements. Its not entirely unusual though, even though it may upset some people.

    If you reported it to HR, it may be that the manager has already put this to HR, and if he hasn't then its up to him unless he is required to do so. Do you know what the manager's reason are for shortlisting who he did, even if they don't meet certain criteria?
  • In reply to David Perry:

    Less experienced staff members are easier to manipulate and work more than 50 hours a week to keep up with the job demands. Our head likes to forge relationships with other departments and delegate as much as possible. If they only wanted X person, they shouldn’t have advertised the job and waste people’s time. The entire process has become a mockery. Thank you for replying.
  • In reply to Ashley:

    In which case Ashley, you have answered your own question.

    Yes, I agree advertising for a post when you've already got a suitable candidate (for the reasons you give), is making a mockery of the recruitment process. Perhaps you aught to encourage HR to change their procedures then.