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Interview practice to gauge emotional intelligence

I’ve just had a horrible interview experience from a company who has a practice of grilling people in an interview to see how they react in a stressful situations. I advocate for gauging emotional intelligence, but I believe there’s a way of doing so in a dignified manner. The recruiter who interviewed me was very rude, didn’t let me finish my statement, quite patronizing and ended the interview with “I’m interviewing other candidates too and you will know in the next few days if you’re shortlisted for the next stage.” I believe that we as HR professionals have the responsibility to maintain a good company reputation. I walked out of that interview thinking “I don’t want to work for an organization if the HR department can’t maintain their tact. I interview people as well and my way to gauge emotional intelligence is to ask hard questions such as “what do you not enjoy about your current job” then follow up or “what’s your short term, mid-term and long term career goals?” What do you think? Thanks!
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  • Quite unfortunate.
  • I agree that rudeness is inappropriate and that the candidate experience is important. Recruitment is partly a selling job as well as an assessment one.

    But in terms of the exit words about seeing other people I think that’s pretty standard ( probably with a thank you for coming) personally I think the second of your questions to gauge EI is (for me) almost entirely pointless and I am not sure the first one always gets to the bottom of it.
  • I’m not sure wether this is part of the company culture or a individual act that represents the the recruiter himself . In this case I would definitely write a feedback to the company explaining the situation and if they are really interested in maintaining a good image for their organisation they will do the needful