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Can promotion be considered part of Reward Management?

I'm currently studying the Reward Management Course, and i was wondering, does promotion count as a type of reward when it comes to the employees?

Share your thoughts :)

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  • Hi Meryam
    The most common use of the word "reward" in HR circles tends to limit its meaning to cash and or benefits. A Total Reward Management approach will include pay, benefits, working environment, career progression, development opportunitues, recognition processes (including saying "thank you"!) and a wealth of other factors that make up the employee value proposition - pulling them all together in a much broader notion of "reward". This is the core of my full day's teaching on Total Reward Management for students on a one-year MBA in international hr with comp & ben speciality.
  • In reply to Ray:

    Thanks ray, i agree with you. Reward is a broad term. Promotion is more linked with Performance Management rather than Rewards, since it's part of motivation to perform better in order to get promoted.

    But my point is, some organisations have different levels of rewards when you go up the scale, so I believe an employee may want to get promoted in order to get more rewards.. Am i right?
  • Hi, Context is everything ....in some organisations "promotion" may be embedded in the culture and dna as part of the reward mechanism. In others it may be seen as counter productive. By way of example of the latter, I worked in one company where use of the word "promotion" in organisation announcements was dropped in favour of using the term " appointment or appointed to the position of xxx" as it was felt that this was less divisive. I am sure that you will find many different perspectives on this subject so hopefully adding context to the input you receive will be helpful as you reflect on this part of your Reward Management course.
  • Steve Bridger

    | 0 Posts

    Community Manager

    6 Nov, 2018 09:53

    In reply to Meryem:

    Worth recognising that not all people are motivated primarily by money...

    Source

  • Steve Bridger

    | 0 Posts

    Community Manager

    6 Nov, 2018 09:54

    In reply to Meryem:

    ...and welcome to the Community,
  • In reply to Kevin Elvidge:

    Thanks Kevin. I highly appreciate your answer and agree.

    Regards,
  • In reply to Steve Bridger:

    Awesome! Thanks for the infographic.
  • In reply to Steve Bridger:

    Happy to join!
    Thanks

  • In reply to Meryem:

    As Kevin says, the 'recognition' aspect of the word 'reward' is strongly driven by the culture of a company and the characteristics of the different segments of employees in it. Benefits or rewards are not in themselves attractive or motivating, it is the perceived value that different groups of employees will grant them - hence my regular 'rant' in these forums on the importance of understanding what your staff want and what they appreciate...
  • The question in my view can be answered quite easily. Yes or no depending on what box the company sees it as belonging in and similarily what box the employee sees it in.

    In effect I don't think it matters - other than being seen and answered in a very academic way.

    Steve's post has nailed it quite clearly.
  • Hi Meryam
    I am inclined to believe that promotion does form part of rewards. It reconciles in my view an instant gratification and the fulfilment of a longer term aspiration since the promotion brings in its stride an upgrade in remuneration, benefits and exposure. I think that Promotion is a broader form of reward.
    Cheers
    Reena
  • In reply to David Perry:

    Indeed, thanks David
  • In reply to Reena:

    I agree with you, i believe as long as you look at the context , and the company culture, than the perception of promotion can be taken into consideration.
  • Steve Bridger

    | 0 Posts

    Community Manager

    7 Nov, 2018 08:53

    In reply to Meryem:

    Many years ago I worked in an organisation where promotion was almost an inevitable consequence of longevity of employment. As a result performance was rather uneven.